Europa Nostra Awards 2017

Four Italian teams among the winners with outstanding projects

21-04-201706:56by
St Maria Maggiore, Rome, where composer Giovanni Palestrina took singing lessons. Original Artwork: Engraving by Piranesi
St Maria Maggiore, Rome, where composer Giovanni Palestrina took singing lessons. Original Artwork: Engraving by Piranesi. (Credits: Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

The European Commission has recently announced the winners of the 2017 Europa Nostra Awards, the European Union (EU) prize for cultural heritage. The winners were 29 in total, coming from 18 EU countries and they were awarded for the exceptional results achieved in the fields of conservation, research, active service, didactics, education, training and public awareness.

Among the winners there are four Italian projects. For the category “conservation”, La Piramide Bianca (The White Pyramid) in Rome. The emblematic monument – the only one of the kind still present in the capital, first built in the 1st century B.C – is going to be renovated. The renovation will be financed by the Japanese Yuzo Yagi, who wanted to express his gratitude to Italy for the growth of his company in the country. The renovation will also be eco-friendly, using sustainable techniques and materials. The EU Commission has greatly appreciated both the validity of the project and the Japanese patron’s involvement as a sign of a brilliant transnational cooperation.

The second Italian project awarded was the Carnival King of Europe (San Michele all’Adige). The project was awarded for the category “research” and – thanks to the partnership with 9 European museums –  the project compares European winter mask traditions in order to find common roots and traditions across the countries.

Museo Piranesi (Milano) was also awarded for the category “research”. The idea was conceived by Professor Pierluigi Panza who devoted his whole life to the study of the artist Giovanni Battista Piranesi. Prof. Panza’s research led to the discovery of a private collection of the artist, identifying 269 pieces scattered in 43 different venues, including the Vatican museums, the British Museum and the Louvre. The digital publication of the newly identified collection will give birth to a virtual “Museo Piranesi” of the 18th century.

Lastly, Il Cartastorie: the archives tell about themselves (Naples) was awarded for the categories “education, training and awareness”. The project promotes and safeguards the cultural heritage of the Banco di Napoli Foundation. The archives of the foundation tell about 500 years of Naples history, offering a window on the past. The project aims at reconstructing this past through a multimedia path thanks to creative tools.

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